Opening Possibilities, Illuminating Potentials
Islandwide Free Delivery. 2-5 Days.
Contact Us 0764980321

The Price of Inequality

Rs. 2,790.00

Joseph Stiglitz

 

A forceful argument against America’s vicious circle of growing inequality by the Nobel Prize–winning economist.

 

“A definitive examination of inequality’s effects not only on the economy, but on democracy and globalization.”
― The Daily Beast

 

“Stiglitz’s ideas in this book will prompt wide discussion and debate.”
 Booklist

 

“An impassioned argument backed by rigorous economic analysis.”
― Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

 

The single most comprehensive counterargument to both Democratic neoliberalism and Republican laissez-faire theories…Stiglitz’s contribution…to the public debate cannot be overestimated.”
 Thomas B. Edsall, New York Times Book Review

 

“A model of clarity.”
― Jared Bernstein, Rolling Stone

Only 1 left in stock

The top 1 percent of Americans control some 40 percent of the nation’s wealth. But as Joseph E. Stiglitz explains in this best-selling critique of the economic status quo, this level of inequality is not inevitable. Rather, in recent years well-heeled interests have compounded their wealth by stifling true, dynamic capitalism and making America no longer the land of opportunity that it once was.

They have made America the most unequal advanced industrial country while crippling growth, distorting key policy debates, and fomenting a divided society. Stiglitz not only shows how and why America’s inequality is bad for our economy but also exposes the effects of inequality on our democracy and on our system of justice while examining how monetary policy, budgetary policy, and globalization have contributed to its growth. With characteristic insight, he diagnoses our weakened state while offering a vision for a more just and prosperous future.

 

About the author

Joseph E. Stiglitz is a professor of economics at Columbia University and the recipient of a John Bates Clark Medal and a Nobel Prize. He is also the former senior vice president and chief economist of the World Bank. His books include Globalization and Its Discontents, The Three Trillion Dollar War, and Making Globalization Work. He lives in New York City.

 

Book Specifications

Title: The Price of Inequality
Author: Joseph Stiglitz
Language: English
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 592
Weight: 400g
Published Year: 2012
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 978-0718197384
Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.5 x 19.8 cm
Print size: Please feel free to drop us a message.

You may also like…

  • The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money & Power

    Rs. 4,990.00

    Daniel Yergin

     

    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and hailed as “the best history of oil ever written” by Business Week, Daniel Yergin’s “spellbinding…irresistible” (The New York Times) account of the global pursuit of oil, money, and power addresses the ongoing energy crisis.

     

    “Splendid and epic history of oil…. The story is brilliantly told…with its remarkable cast of characters.” — The Wall Street Journal

     

    “Impassioned and riveting…only in the great epics of Homer will readers regularly run into a comparable string of larger-than-life swashbucklers and statesmen, heroes and villains.” — San Francisco Examiner

     

    “A masterly narrative…The Prize portrays the interweaving of national and corporate interests, the conflicts and stratagems, the miscalculations, the follies, and the ironies.” — James Schlesinger, former U.S. Secretary of Defense and U.S. Secretary of Energy

     

    “Spellbinding…irresistible…monumental…must be read to understand the first thing about the role of oil in modern history.” — The New York Times

    Add to cart
  • Amazon Unbound: Jeff Bezos and the Invention of a Global Empire

    Rs. 3,290.00

    Brad Stone

     

    ‘Stone’s new volume is on its surface a business book that seeks to explain the rise of America’s most important private enterprise… Amazon Unbound is particularly valuable in explaining how the company makes money, and the day-to-day decisions that end up having a big effect on consumers… a dense, at times juicy tour of the company Bezos built.’ (Ben Smith New York Times)

     

    Fascinating and deeply researched… Stone is at his best describing Bezos’s demanding style of management… Masterful.’ (Marc Levinson Washington Post)

     

    ‘An excellent new book…Bezos emerges as the ur-billionaire of our time, the deft wielder of a fortune so vast that he and his company are becoming “perilously close to invincible”.’ (Farhad Manjoo New York Times)

     

    ‘In this vivid, anecdote-filled page-turner of a book, Stone goes deep inside a company with colossal power, one we rely on for low-cost, wonderful service, and one that also kills many businesses and jobs. With rare access to Amazon executives, readers are taken inside Amazon meetings, see up close Jeff Bezos’s brilliance but also his belligerence, understand the trade-off between impressive efficiency versus the perils of market dominance, and get an up-to-the-moment appreciation of why government is now awake to the monopoly dangers posed by digital giants like Amazon.’ (Ken Auletta, author of Googled )

     

    ‘Amazon’s reach is so extensive that it can seem easier to list the few areas of commerce that it doesn’t touch than the many it does. Stone even-handedly describes the history, expansion and major personalities of the company.’ (Curtis Sittenfeld, my favourite non-fiction books The Week)

     

    ‘There are really only a handful of writers who can craft a page-turning narrative about the most transformative business ideas. Brad Stone is one. His topic of choice – Amazon and its founder Jeff Bezos – is equal to his journalistic skill. In this book, he gives us his second must-read account of how the world’s most important company and technology titan captured not only global retail, but Washington, Hollywood, outer space and your brain.’ (Rana Foroohar, author of Makers and Takers and Don’t Be Evil )

    Add to cart
  • From Third World to First: The Singapore Story – 1965-2000

    Rs. 4,990.00

    Lee Kuan Yew

     

    In this memoir, the man most responsible for Singapore’s astonishing transformation from colonial backwater to economic powerhouse describes how he did it over the last four decades. It’s a dramatic story, and Lee Kuan Yew has much to brag about. To take a single example: Singapore had a per-capita GDP of just $400 when he became prime minister in 1959. When he left office in 1990, it was $12,200 and rising. (At the time of this book’s writing, it was $22,000.) Much of this was accomplished through a unique mix of economic freedom and social control. Lee encouraged entrepreneurship, but also cracked down on liberties that most people in the West take for granted–chewing gum, for instance. It’s banned in Singapore because of “the problems caused by spent chewing gum inserted into keyholes and mailboxes and on elevator buttons.” If American politicians were to propose such a thing, they’d undoubtedly be run out of office. Lee, however, defends this and similar moves, such as strong antismoking laws and antispitting campaigns: “We would have been a grosser, ruder, cruder society had we not made these efforts to persuade people to change their ways…. It has made Singapore a more pleasant place to live in. If this is a ‘nanny state,’ I am proud to have fostered one.”

    Lee also describes one of his most controversial proposals: tax breaks and schooling incentives to encourage educated men and women to marry each other and have children. “Our best women were not reproducing themselves because men who were their educational equals did not want to marry them…. This lopsided marriage and procreation pattern could not be allowed to remain unmentioned and unchecked,” writes Lee. Most of the book, however, is a chronicle of how Lee helped create so much material prosperity. Anticommunism is a strong theme throughout, and Lee comments broadly on international politics. He is cautiously friendly toward the United States, chastising it for a “dogmatic and evangelical” foreign policy that scolds other countries for human-rights violations, except when they interfere with American interests, “as in the oil-rich Arabian peninsula.” Even so, he writes, “the United States is still the most benign of all the great powers…. [and] all noncommunist countries in East Asia prefer America to be the dominant weight in the power balance of the region.” From Third World to First is not the most gripping book imaginable, but it is a vital document about a fascinating place in a time of profound transition. –John J. Miller

    Add to cart